join

A Case For Fixed Mic Placement On Electric Guitar Amps

Brandon Drury —  November 5, 2012 — 2 Comments
guitar mic placement

guitar mic placement

Anyone who’s done this recording thing for more than a day knows full well what mic placement CAN do.  The mic in the wrong spot sucks and a mic in the right spot sounds good….right?  No!  I don’t think so.  Not exactly.  At best, that’s just one small factor.  I think there’s a whole lot more to this gig of recording electric guitar than mic placement and that’s what we are going to talk about today.

I’ve probably seen thousand of guitar players on the forum mention how much their guitar tone ROCKS but when they put a mic in front it the recorded sound ain’t the same.  I can’t really argue with that.  Never has that feeling of a cranked 4×12 shaking the house ever been recreated by a studio monitor with a 6″ speaker or an alarm clock.  Hell, we RARELY want any shaking at all from our guitar tracks.  Not if there’s a bass or kick drum anyway.

I’d also argue that no recording ever really gets this right, either.  You can’t really get the feeling of a fighter jet blasting by from looking at a post card or seeing it on TV.  Even a 100,000 watt pedophile/audophile home theater system is a COMPLETE joke when compared to the real thing.   Some forms of brute physics simply need to be experienced first hand.  However, this doesn’t mean we can’t make killer records.  It just means our tones need to make sense when the Earth doesn’t feel like it’s splitting in two.

Battle Hardened

The truth is once I know a guitar cabinet, I mic it the same basic way every single time.  What will I gain from moving a mic on an electric guitar cabinet?  This is 101 level stuff, but here goes.

1 – One one dimension, moving the mic closer gets me more low end and pulling it back gives me less low end (if we are using a mic with proximity effect….which is pretty much all the popular electric guitar mics).  We could think of this as a low shelf equalizer if we wanted to.  It wouldn’t be far off.

Note:  While no one wants to mention EQ on a mic placement discussion, but if any of us were handed bass heavy electric guitar tracks, the first thing we’d do is put a low shelf cut on them or maybe a high pass filter depending on the kind of bass heaviness.  So I’ll argue low shelving and mic distance are in the same ballpark as far as the proximity effect is concerned.

2 – Another dimension, we can move closer to the center of the guitar speaker (the dust cap) and we will hear more top end.  That’s where the upper midrange on the guitar comes from.  We can move away from the center and the tone will get darker.  This ain’t worlds away from a high shelf EQ.  Again, no one preaches this, but it’s the tool we’d most likely reach for with guitars that are too bright or too dark in the mixing process.

3 – The last dimension is the first dimension again only different.  If we toss the mic directly on the grill of the speaker cabinet, the direct signal of the cabinet to room sound ratio is basically 100/0 or maybe 99.999 / 0.001 (I’m ignoring comb filtering induced by really bad room acoustics in this case.  Those you can’t avoid no matter what the mic placement).  Pull the mic back 10′ and it may be 30/70 or something.  (It’s kinda hard to concoct numbers for this.)  Depending on your room, this ain’t too far from reverb assuming you have a reverb impulse that sounds exactly like your room.

Quick Recap
Okay, so we have for all practical purposes a high shelf boost/cut, a low shelf boost/cut, and a reverb wet/dry setting  when we slap a mic on a cabinet. [I]I realize this ain’t a million percent accurate or perfect, but humor me.[/I]

That’s It???????
With all the talk of mic placement, mic placement, mic placement why is it all we are given are two shelves and a too-small-room reverb (usually)?  Granted, when adjusting all of these at the same time, you’ll hear drastic differences in the way the tone is captured, but for all the talk of mic placement it seems we’d have more control over TONE than this.

It’s my view that 90% of all TRULY great guitar tones could be captured quite well with a Shure SM57 on the edge of the dustcap 1″ off the grill?  (Yes, I own a Royer R121, too.  So what.  A 57 works.)    “Truly” in caps is the operative word here.  I can hear a guitar in the room and immediately know that a 57 in that good ol’ generic spot will give me something to work with in a song.  I know because I’ve done this enough and hit the jackpot with enough tones that needed zero intervention on my part to know.  That’s one of the perks of recording a zillion bands.  When I hear this amp in the room I call it a “Great Guitar Sound”.  (Pretty creative, huh!)

My Point

So what happens when I hear an amp and I’m not so sure a 57 in the good ol’ spot will work?  I usually try it anyway.  If there is too much low end, I can move back.  Of course, this gets more room sound which I definitely don’t want unless the room sounds freakin’ awesome (which rules out 99% of all home recording rooms).  If it’s too bright I can move further away from the center.

The only problem is I can’t recall EVER how I shaped a not-great guitar sound in the room into a Great Guitar Sound on the monitors by moving a mic around.  Not once has this ever happened.  There are more factors than simply shelving and ambiance.  There are fundamental tone characteristics that go into a mega tone that surpass that of shelves and ambiance.

The Panty Section

I don’t like going to the Panty Section when shopping.  It bothers me doing things that were meant for the internet in some store.  I think men generally don’t like going there.  I’ve noticed a similar occurrence with guitar players.  They seem to be too embarrassed to put their face between two speakers (I’m forcing a legs joke here) and take a listen to a distant approximation of what a mic will pick up.*

You’ve probably had this problem reinforced when watching another band live.  Experienced folks know to never stand in a place where a guitar cab is on axis unless there’s a pantied reason nearby.  That’s the ears-bleed section.  How a rational person could take that onslaught for an hour is beyond me.  Raise a guitar cabinet to ear level of the noise maker controlling it and you’ll see him make adjustments almost like clockwork.

*Note:  The mics in your locker work nothing like human hearing.  That $10,000 Neumann binaural thingy will get you close, however.  Other than that listening will only get you so far.

The Problem

In short, few guitar players (even those with such a ‘rocking” tone) have even bothered to get the faintest idea of what a mic (or audience)  will hear them.  Even if they did, their hearing ain’t the same as a microphone’s anyway.  Some of these perspectives on what a “rocking” guitar are are based on the “bedroom mentality”, which is something I cover in greater depth in Killer Home Recording.  In short, their guitar tone was dialed in without the context of a kick drum or bass guitar.

I’m curious how most guitar players who claim to have such a “rocking” tone came to that conclusion.  I suspect their vantage point is different from mine.

After 11 Years Of Doing This…..

I’ve come to the conclusion that the best results occur when we focus on tossing that cabinet in the live room, putting a known mic on a known cabinet, and using the same old edge-of-dust cap mic placement a inch from the cabinet.  This sound ALWAYS works if (and this is a big if) we have control of the amp and guitar.  This doesn’t mean we can’t move the mic a bit for an extra 10% here or 10% there.  It just means that it doesn’t make sense to use nitrous oxide as a solution to a car that won’t start.  It’s best to stick with tried and true defaults along the way until this “rocking tone” has proven itself.  Then we can put the cherry on top.

Once we know that the “rocking tone” passes the monitors test we can do all the usual engineering tail-chasing circus stunts of trying out different mics and move them 1mm this way and 1mm that way to squeeze a few more percentage points out of the deal, in theory.  At least these things make us feel like we did something.

When a recorded tone ain’t happening, it’s nice to know that you’ve got a few known factors you can count on.  While mic placement COULD be to blame, it’s nice to have our meat-n-potatoes placement we can always count on.  This gives us a troubleshooting foundation to start from.

Clean Tone Test
Ever notice that micing a clean guitar amp can often be done in 3 seconds.  You can toss up a mic on a clean guitar sound and get what you need almost with no effort at all.  With the exact same signal chain (Same guitar player > guitar > amp > cabinet > mic > preamp > compressor > converter > bla bla bla) all we change is the channel on the amp or a pedal before the amp and it all goes to hell.  Why?  Simple.  The clean tone WAS actually great (what we needed) and the distorted tone WASN’T great.  It needs to be rethought and retweaked regardless of who says it’s “great”.

Conclusion

The default mic placement with the a good ol’ SM57 or equivalent  works 90% on great guitar sounds.  So many guitar players who’ve maybe pulled out the credit card on a boatload of guitar stuff haven’t even done the due diligence to listen with that cab blasting their face and even fewer have bothered thinking of their tone in the context of a bass player or kick drum.  This makes me question the tone EVERY TIME a guitar player can’t capture his “rocking” tone.

When a source is truly great, there ain’t that much “engineering” left to do.  You could throw up a Radio Shack mic in front of Mariah Carey and you’d come out with something fairly astonishing.  And while you may find that you do want 10% more low end here and 10% more ambiance there, that mic placement is never going to make up for me singing.

Before blaming the engineering end of this gig (a mostly damage control job), be extra skeptical of what’s in front of the mic.  Nudge that with a stick and see if that gets you anywhere.  You’ll find it bears a whole lot more fruit than mindlessly moving a mic around for a few days. YMMV

Brandon

Saved Comments


guywithaguitar – 11-28-2012, 09:49 AM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

This was brilliant! You’ve put the voodoo of mic placement in newbie engineering terms, and that is a real help.

SnowNCycle’s Avatar
SnowNCycle – 11-28-2012, 10:01 AM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Great Article. How many Prima Donna guitar players need to read this as it applies to their “live sound”.

solidwalnut’s Avatar
solidwalnut – 11-28-2012, 10:21 AM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Yep. Gotta work with what you have and know how to capture using a mic. ‘Killer live tone’ ain’t the same, as you’re saying. What works for me in most all cabinet situations is a three-mic capture, the reason being that one mic is not going to satisfy all mixes or design intentions. Which is what you’re also saying, but I think (even though you’re probably speaking for the majority of rooms) that you’re advocating that an engineer needs to be satisfied with that 90% and move on.

If you have a decent room to record in, then take advantage of capturing the different flavors all at once (gotta be wary of that sin of comb filtering). Get that SM57 or whatever in the 90% zone, but also capture some of the flavor of the room and some of the flavor of either low or high end of the speaker, depending on the design intent, so there are more choices at mixdown. If you don’t have a decent room, then, yah, what-up with spending a zillion dollars on mics.

And even if someone recorded Mariah Cary with a RS mic, they’d blow that gig if they didn’t pay attention to -18dBFS = 0VU. That mistake could be magnified even more when recording an overdriven speaker.

Steve

harrisunit’s Avatar
harrisunit – 11-28-2012, 10:24 AM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Totally agree with the SM57 placement. For me, the second non-negotiable is a large diaphragm condenser about 3 feet away from the cab on a line between the center of the speaker and where the guitar player’s ears would be when he stands in front of his amp.

When I pull up that second fader the guitarist always smiles because that’s the sound he’s used to hearing. I need the clean crunch of the 57 for my base, but the second mic is what enables me to capture the character.

cporro’s Avatar
cporro – 11-28-2012, 10:24 AM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

one thing to consider…guitar players usually listen to their tone through a very loud amp. their ears are fletcher munsoned out. they have enough low end in there to shack their spleen. how can that volume sound as exciting as 60db coming out of a flat-ish monitor?

waitsongs’s Avatar
waitsongs – 11-28-2012, 11:56 AM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Quote Originally Posted by harrisunit View Post
Totally agree with the SM57 placement. For me, the second non-negotiable is a large diaphragm condenser about 3 feet away from the cab on a line between the center of the speaker and where the guitar player’s ears would be when he stands in front of his amp.

When I pull up that second fader the guitarist always smiles because that’s the sound he’s used to hearing. I need the clean crunch of the 57 for my base, but the second mic is what enables me to capture the character.
Great article, and I completely agree with this approach too. The second LDC 3 feet away lets the amp breathe more. Lately I’m also splitting the guitar signal as well and going into an Eleven Rack to get both another “amp” tone and a clean direct at the same time, just in case I need it. That’s four tracks for every guitar take, but it seems to give me everything I’d ever need.

briguy1960′s Avatar
briguy1960 – 11-28-2012, 12:00 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Quote Originally Posted by harrisunit View Post
Totally agree with the SM57 placement. For me, the second non-negotiable is a large diaphragm condenser about 3 feet away from the cab on a line between the center of the speaker and where the guitar player’s ears would be when he stands in front of his amp.

When I pull up that second fader the guitarist always smiles because that’s the sound he’s used to hearing. I need the clean crunch of the 57 for my base, but the second mic is what enables me to capture the character.
A tweak to try with this method is to turn the amp up and just leave the guitar (single coil best) on so you get some noise coming out of the speakers. put some cans on and throw the ldc channel out of phase. adjust the ldc mic until the sound is the thinnest then flip the phase back. This will be the least amount of phase distortion you can get out of the room/cab combo. Also, for recording, use less distortion than you think you want on the final track. Double track , or more the part slighty cleaner and it will sound large and still articulate.

B

123buckhead’s Avatar
123buckhead – 11-28-2012, 12:32 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

A trick for gittin that big live sound if ya got the space. 1 close mic a 57 or an Audix i5 or even a senn609, another about 10′ out pointing at the cab a small dia an 81 works well here,then about 15′ or more if you have the room if you have a large piece of glass or maybe if you have a control room you point another large cond, at the glass you will need to play with how close to the glass to place your mic it works well for me at about 4′ then play with levels on your mixer and you can get the room sound by playin with the mic levels I have done this with a big Marshall cab as well as a 15 watt Bad Cat a Fender Champ. You can shange the angle of the glass as how you lean against the wall I tend to pull the bottom edge out about 18″ so the refections are pointed at the ceiling. It all dependes on if U have theroom and the mic’s. And as always it’s hard to beat a 57 on the front end. Some of may have seen this done before it’s been around fo a long time but it works,BIG TYME

ElectroWaveStudios’s Avatar
ElectroWaveStudios – 11-28-2012, 01:35 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Brandon, could you provide some examples of what you think is a big guitar sound or if you have some samples of what you consider great guitar tone that you’ve recorded in the past to compare with what others have in their heads as a great sound and their opinions of what that is…
ZZ Top has used one of those Cigarette Pack Smokey Amps on a couple of recordings and managed to make it sound big likewise I think Ross Robinson used a Mini Marshall amp miced up in a drawer for a couple of tracks with Korn. I think it is all very subjective as to what constitutes good tone even though you’re following general guidelines when micing the speaker. In my opinion the magic must be really happening somewhere further down the chain, maybe it’s on the mastering bus or the mastering process which makes that guitar sound larger than life.

ElectroWaveStudios’s Avatar
ElectroWaveStudios – 11-28-2012, 01:54 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Quote Originally Posted by briguy1960 View Post
A tweak to try with this method is to turn the amp up and just leave the guitar (single coil best) on so you get some noise coming out of the speakers. put some cans on and throw the ldc channel out of phase. adjust the ldc mic until the sound is the thinnest then flip the phase back. This will be the least amount of phase distortion you can get out of the room/cab combo. Also, for recording, use less distortion than you think you want on the final track. Double track , or more the part slighty cleaner and it will sound large and still articulate.

B
I like it, but again it would depend on if you had a decent sounding room to achieve this methinks…

123buckhead’s Avatar
123buckhead – 11-28-2012, 03:20 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Yup I can I am am ol Guy Been Playin since I was 11 am 59 nowadays. I toured for years in what most would call the big league. Nowadays I still play out some but mainly write in my own studio and record a lot of other folks. I have done shows to crowds of 40 to 70K. Back in the day a big sound came from a wall of 100 watt marshalls But we didn’t have the PA gear that’s out there now with huge arrays and massive subs. I now have 70% loss in my hi-end hearing from those back in the days crap. Mixin is way tuff for me But with the monitors I use I get by.BUT I would define the BIG Guitar sound as tone not volume I use a Hot Cat 15 now and an Avalon 30 and switch between the two. The sounds I would A/B against would be the players Steely Dan has used over the years, Buddy Whittington out of Fort Worth. And of course the biggest sounds in the day always came from uncle Ted with his wall of twins. As far as I am cocerned there are only a handful of real guitar players out there for you to listen to now. Most of the pop stuff that makes the money they don’t even seem to care about tone. We still Have Brent Mason Satchmo. Johnson and some of those cats Clapton is still at it. But I have a real problem even listening to some of the stuff that’s out there,,And yes I know it’s all about the money always has been and always will be. But if you want the same kinda tones that cut through fat and smooth you can do it now with a pignose..Anybody remember those things. Even with a small set up you can find those tones. Like Brandon says you get the fat from the close mic the other two I use are to get the big live effect. Whatcha gotta loose give it try and U may be surprised. I did a session back in 77 at Criteria and that’s where I saw it used for the fisrt time and it sounded like I was on stage plus the bennifits of the studio gear 1176′s and some DBX units the sound was BIG…But we where also able to saturate on some 2′ tape. I am from Nawlins so I know great tone tone when I hear it, just like there is in Nashville Austin. Listen to the guitar gods of the day record a few trac’s into your DAW and run some tools/Scopes on em and look to match those sounds and your there. Like I say the room U have the better…….
Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Hillbilly View Post
Brandon, could you provide some examples of what you think is a big guitar sound or if you have some samples of what you consider great guitar tone that you’ve recorded in the past to compare with what others have in their heads as a great sound and their opinions of what that is…
ZZ Top has used one of those Cigarette Pack Smokey Amps on a couple of recordings and managed to make it sound big likewise I think Ross Robinson used a Mini Marshall amp miced up in a drawer for a couple of tracks with Korn. I think it is all very subjective as to what constitutes good tone even though you’re following general guidelines when micing the speaker. In my opinion the magic must be really happening somewhere further down the chain, maybe it’s on the mastering bus or the mastering process which makes that guitar sound larger than life.

DE-T-RIOT’s Avatar
DE-T-RIOT – 11-28-2012, 05:04 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Whats a good large condenser mic too add with the 57 for recording distorted guitar?

aditejada’s Avatar
aditejada – 11-28-2012, 05:04 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

I was at practice the other night and was playing through two guitar cabs (a marshall and mesa cab with one amp head) that we’re spread apart, I noticed that in certain areas of the room my tone sounded huge and really heavy with the way the two cabs mixed, I was wishing there was a way to capture it… I know this doesn’t pertain 100% to Brandon’s article which makes great points that recording a guitar amp can never fully capture the energy a rocking live amp feels like but I was just wondering if anyone’s ever tried (or hear of) recording two guitar cabs with one mic?

123buckhead’s Avatar
123buckhead – 11-28-2012, 08:30 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

On Heavy Distortion I use the 609 with a Mojave MA300 at 10 ft’ With just the two.. I still think the three is the deal in that case on distortion I use a i5 close just thickness of my hand an Shure SM 81 at ten’ and the MA300 at the glass the cool thing about using the vari pattern at the glass is U can play with the polar patterns and it relly gets cool if ya go to fig 8 on the glass you also get more of the room there so ya just gotta play witdim sucka’s

bigbang3′s Avatar
bigbang3 – 11-28-2012, 08:32 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

All well and good, and most of the info is boilerplate, however a word of caution if you use two mics that are a different distance from your soundsource even if it is only 2-3 feet be sure to time align when you are done- you will be amazed at just how much phase cancellation happens when you mic this way and time aligning just brings so much more body into the guitar sound that often much less EQ is needed make the guitar have just that certain something that makes the track really shine. Personally I like using large diaphragm dynamics for my second mic – like an old RE20 or a D12- very sweet for those dirty guitars!

123buckhead’s Avatar
123buckhead – 11-28-2012, 09:05 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Never tried those mic’s But I Will,, always playin and tunin em. I always have the #2 mic at least 10 feet out but if you don’t have the room you are dead on… U gonna have some huge phase issues. When I had my second studio up in North Carolina I didn’t have the room had just went Divorce hell and lost everything as in all my stuff I was still using tape machines then and it was right before DAW’s came to be so she cleaned my tape clock out. But what I had to do was just throw some basic mic-pre’s on em and and flip the phase out on # 2and # 3 it worked but not as well as in my other life with the bigger room. I had to rent an ol farm house so at That Time.(which really sucked) the ol house had a huge bath room with the big cast iron tub,,,Funny but true I got the best sounds putting a Deluxe Reveverb in the tub on a towel so it wouldn’t slide around tilting it back pointing up at the ceilin NOT flat on the back but about 70 degree angle or so 1 close and one as high as I could get the stand. I guess the iron tub was tuned or something it had just the right amount of fat. Ain’t it crazy some of the stuff we try out. U have surely use the shower. Hell I even sat a marshall stack up in the ol barn one nite with some 100′ cables the tin roof did the trick for that session I never told that one till now it had a way cool sound but if some knew you would do that kinda stuff to get the sound they wanted you would have to hire a road crew to move gear. I have a friend who was s studio grunt in New York back in the day the Simon and Garfunkel song the Boxer with that big drum hit in the chourus was done CHECK THIS OUT they opened up the elevatator door walked down the stairs set a lo-tuned snare on the floor dropped a headphone line down the shaft from the fourth floor hung a big condensor out the door and let the drummer whack it on cue from my buddy lookin 4 floors down at him. the part where they do the la-da-da(BOOM) is how they got that effect….I’m thinkin we all damn crazy sometimes

jeffncatr_1′s Avatar
jeffncatr_1 – 11-28-2012, 11:35 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Quote Originally Posted by SnowNCycle View Post
Great Article. How many Prima Donna guitar players need to read this as it applies to their “live sound”.

I agree most guitar players are referring the the sound they hear while playing a few feet away and most of the time alone this is not the tone you want in a mix as you will be stepping into mud!

b1daly’s Avatar
b1daly – 11-28-2012, 11:37 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

I think this is overstating the case here by a lot. First, I don’t know anyone who has suggested you can fundamentally change the tone of a guitar by moving a mic. It’s about capturing a sound that works in the context of your mix. It’s not a trivial change at all to move the mic around near a speaker, in the same way that it’s not a trivial change to run your signal through a high pass filter. In addition, while the effect is reminiscent of an EQ when you move a mic from center of a speaker to edge, it’s only a little. Rather than lowering the amount of certain frequencies in a tone, you are actually changing which frequencies are even present in the tone.

Along these lines, just angling a 57 so that the diaphragm is parallel to the speaker cone surface will give a very different tone color.

Second, adding a second mic can do wonders for capture the sound of a guitar cabinent. The sound of a guitar cabinet comes from the whole structure, and often the sound present right at the speaker is just not representative at all of the tone. Nobody listens to a guitar amp with their ear at the speaker. Just because it’s easier to just stick a 57 there doesn’t mean that’s the “true” sound of the rig.

And the placement of that second mic, makes a huge difference in tone.

ElectroWaveStudios’s Avatar
ElectroWaveStudios – 11-29-2012, 07:35 AM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Quote Originally Posted by 123buckhead View Post
On Heavy Distortion I use the 609 with a Mojave MA300 at 10 ft’ With just the two.. I still think the three is the deal in that case on distortion I use a i5 close just thickness of my hand an Shure SM 81 at ten’ and the MA300 at the glass the cool thing about using the vari pattern at the glass is U can play with the polar patterns and it relly gets cool if ya go to fig 8 on the glass you also get more of the room there so ya just gotta play witdim sucka’s
That soundz like a really good method. Will definitely try it out. Thanks for sharing it

jraassina’s Avatar
jraassina – 11-29-2012, 02:59 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Good article. The tone of the amp and feel of the guitarist are huge factors in the quality of the recording… And yes, the tone that shakes the stage will probably not work when recorded. The 57 + larger mic combo works for me. In the mix I rarely combine mics, it’s hard enough getting one guitar track to sit properly – I just audition them within the mix and pick the one that sounds the best, then work on that signal. I found that you can do very dramatic EQ moves and get really interesting results… like carving a snug fitting puzzle piece.

brandondrury – 11-29-2012, 04:20 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Just in case any of my intent wasn’t hyper clear, I want to state that there is no good reason to stop playing around once you get the SM57 rocking in the “default” place that you know works. You may not end up with a 57 at all and it may end somewhere else. This is for creative-type reason.

My point is that there is no reason why this one single sound couldn’t be usable. If it’s not usable, the source is most likely the problem. It’s the same way that moving a camera doesn’t turn Bigfoot into Jenna Jameson (although they probably look similar nowadays). That doesn’t mean that moving a camera can’t have some cool, creative effects. I just wouldn’t learn on a creative effect unless I really had to.

As far as condensers are concerned, I’m in a very anti-hyper phase. I’m getting great results with the ADK Odin / Thor and am barely touching the my Gefell M930s even though the ADKs are 1/3 the price. On something like guitar room I’m not hearing dramatic enough differences from mic to mic under all conditions to recommend everyone run out and buy X.

Brandon

feegs’s Avatar
feegs – 11-29-2012, 06:10 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

As an alternative due to my noise restrictions, I did some testing last night and the same concept works just fine with Guitar Rig 5. Insert 1 (1 amp to start with and no cab, i used the HOT Solo) followed by Redwirez impulse loader “MIXIr2 with a Marshall 4x cab SM57 at 1″cap edge. Played the guitar riff twice with the set up on both channels. A good starting point at the very LEAST and took me about 10 mins all up and sounds good.

Chris

123buckhead’s Avatar
123buckhead – 11-30-2012, 03:25 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Hey Y’all I was doin some trac’s last nite late,late as the norm wit me..Found a nu trick that came out way interestin I have an eleven rack in my guitar rack, I put the 609 at the amp ran a stereo DI sent one straight in and ran the other into the 11 rack all I can Say is Holy S$^## Man some of the tones I am gittin are unreal it opened up a big As#$@ can of SNAKES!!! if any of ya’s got a pod or any kind of amp modeling device U may wanna try this one on for size. I am a die hard Cubase head and the VST amp Rack on the DI straight in with the mic and 11 rack wuz totally crazy but the sounds I am gittin will (PROMISE YA) knock yo socks clean off your feet and take your feet wit dem sucka’s. I am disabled I took a fall over in Iraq back in 08. So there are days when I can’t sleep for dayz I am still up playin wit dis set up. I’m tellin you all,,,, it’s most certainly worth messin with….The Buckhead, gonna try and go get some ZZZZZZ’s

bigbang3′s Avatar
bigbang3 – 12-11-2012, 12:04 PM
Report Post
Edit
Reply

Quote Originally Posted by 123buckhead View Post
Hey Y’all I was doin some trac’s last nite late,late as the norm wit me..Found a nu trick that came out way interestin I have an eleven rack in my guitar rack, I put the 609 at the amp ran a stereo DI sent one straight in and ran the other into the 11 rack all I can Say is Holy S$^## Man some of the tones I am gittin are unreal it opened up a big As#$@ can of SNAKES!!! if any of ya’s got a pod or any kind of amp modeling device U may wanna try this one on for size. I am a die hard Cubase head and the VST amp Rack on the DI straight in with the mic and 11 rack wuz totally crazy but the sounds I am gittin will (PROMISE YA) knock yo socks clean off your feet and take your feet wit dem sucka’s. I am disabled I took a fall over in Iraq back in 08. So there are days when I can’t sleep for dayz I am still up playin wit dis set up. I’m tellin you all,,,, it’s most certainly worth messin with….The Buckhead, gonna try and go get some ZZZZZZ’s
The fabulous guitarist Johnny A recorded his first two albums going direct- period- I talked to him about his live sound- at the time he was using two Marshall 6100 anniversary heads with the power amp section defeated and just taking the xlr outs for his live sound- the sound guy then sent this back to a pair of single 12″ vocal monitors- I stated something like- yeah, sounds great but what did you use in the studio- he said everything on the first two albums were done exactly the same way- directly in to the board! and his tones are $%^&*#@ awesome !

 

Brandon Drury

Posts Twitter Facebook Google+

Brandon Drury quit counting at 1,200 recorded songs in his busy home recording studio. He is the creator of RecordingReview.com and is the author of the Killer Home Recording series.
join

2 responses to A Case For Fixed Mic Placement On Electric Guitar Amps

  1. Yeah what i see most of the time is they are missing the fell not so much tone .. The #1 thing said is its to thin ! Jack a boat load of bass guitar eq on it an they go yeah thats it !
    Ok so we mute the bass player an or the kick !
    I have one guitar player i record that does have that killer tone . I dare say you could tie a 57 to his belt loop an get a good sound . His guitar sounds good in ever mic on stage [yeah i have record him live ] His guitar show to be all most flat across a wide band on my rane ra27 when he plays . band shifts up band shits down but nothing sticking way out . I have mic him with a 412 an A 57 an others with great sound on all of them . He should be mixing an mastering he has great ears an dont know it !

  2. Yup. With a truly great guitar sound, you could open the door, throw a mic in there, and what you hear in the control room is usually still pretty damn awesome.

    This also explains why MTV unplugged shows often sound great. We all know some live concerts have the vocals overdubbed later, but sometimes that seems less likely. Rarely does production every suffer. Put a great vocalist on an SM58 or equivalent and THAT THING will be in their voice. No question.

Leave a Reply