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Voxengo Soniformer: The Greatest Secret Since The Kennedy Assassination

Brandon Drury —  December 13, 2012 — 3 Comments
Voxengo Soniformer

voxengo-soniformer

Rant
I had heard many people mention  Voxengo Soniformer on the forum in very casual terms.  Phrases like “I like Soniformer” came up.  These people are scum.:p  It’s like there’s  59 of us left on an island and all of us are eating bark and dreams to stay alive.  3 guys say,  “You know, I like the food over in Sector #48.”  Based on their tone, you assume the bark is 1% more moist in Sector #48.  Almost by accident two years later you find out that there’s a teleporter and grandma is Fedexing Thanksgiving dinner perpetually.  WHAT???  I’ve been eating bark all these years and I could have had Grandma’s Thanksgiving dinner this entire time?

WHY…….DIDN’T……YOU……SAYYYYYYYY….SOMETHING?????

The only way I can some this is up is by quoting Dr. Leo Marvin in What About Bob? when Richard Dreyfus stars to lose his mind.  “Dieeeeeeenooofffenawnananananwwww!!!!”

@ 0:20

End Of Rant

This review is me saying that Soniformer is a game changer.  It’s something that EVERYONE should give a try.  I use it on every mix I do.  PERIOD.

To call Soniformer a “mastering” tools is like calling a hammer a tool to keep the wife quiet.  It’s not technically inaccurate, but there are 20,000 other great uses that supersede this one good use.;)  Personally, I feel that Alex over at Voxengo dropped the ball on this one by calling it a “mastering” tool.  A talented audio plugin maker he is, so I’ll give him some slack.

Rant2
I want to mention that I’m pretty damn bored with the concept of upgrades right now.  What do I mean?  I mean that there will be a company this coming year, most likely, that will release a new and improved SM57.  Some guy who engineered a Lenny Kravitz record will endorse it as life changing.  You buy it for 3x the price of a used SM57.  It’ll sound 1% different and 0% better than a SM57.  Gee, thanks.  That’s the usual “upgrade” in a world where a $0.88 knife cuts stuff pretty damn well.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, there’s some guy right now digging a hole with his fingernails.  If you were to approach him and say, “Hey dude,  I’m not sure if you are interested, but here’s a shovel I got at China Mart for $4.99.”  Mr. Finger Digger’s life is about to change.  In other words,  NEW solutions to problems are absolutely priceless.  Arguing whether a person should get a $4.99 shovel or a $19.99 shovel is rather boring, which is what absolutely dominates our audio recording internet land.

Voxengo Soniformer is that new solution to old problems.

Voxengo Soniformer

So What Does Voxengo Soniformer Do?

Most of us know, use, and love at least one multi-band compressor.  I wear out the UAD Precision Multiband as rarely does a mix go by where I don’t use it 3 or 4 times.  Some of you may have the Waves C4 or equivalent.  These plugins take audio and busts it up into 4 bands and that let’s us compress those bands individually.  A way too bright vocal track with lots of spitty top end can be tamed pretty quickly with a fast multiband compressor.  These are great tools for taming problems that only come up some of the time.

The concept is perfect, but there is a downside.  Each of those split bands is basing its compression on the signal exceeding the threshold.  What happens when we have a strong peak that we really want tamed, but this peak is so narrow (High Q) that its total energy isn’t loud enough to actually cross the threshold?  (This is a rather sharp knife and that’s the point.  These hurt!)  The answer is that these little peak slips through.  The compressor doesn’t catch it.  The compressor CAN’T catch it and shouldn’t catch it, because the threshold was never exceeded.  Just following orders says the SS guard.

This problem is similar to that of a 4-band graphic equalizer.  If we have bands of 110Hz, 440Hz, 1.6Khz and 8Khz, what do we do to solve 3k pain problems?  The answer?  Nothing.  We don’t have the resolution to tame that.

Voxengo took the multi-band compression concept and added TONS of resolution.  We now have 32 individual bands of multi-band compression?  What does that mean?  It means maybe a peak at 1.6Khz was too narrow to provide the heft needed to cross the threshold in our conventional wide-band/multi-band compressor, but now that we have 8x the resolution, Voxengo Soniformer is much more likely to catch that little peak.

Examples of uses:

–  Due to the nature of the vocal performance, one syllable hurts at 1.8Khz, another syllable is sibilant, and another syllable has excessive 350Hz junk.  We can gently nudge (or completely crush) all of these problems back into shape with about 4 seconds of tweaking on Soniformer all without touching the syllables that sound good.

Note:  There’s a well-known rumor that Mutt Lange asks his engineers to go in and EQ each individual syllable of a vocal to do compensate for the dramatic changes in a typical vocal performance.  Voxengo Soniformer does a great job of doing something very similar in a fraction of the time.

- 3 notes of a guitar solo ended up on low A string and have some strange, muddy resonance.  Soniformer can nudge those three notes right back into shape without affecting any other notes.

Narrow EQ notching will go along way many of these problems but sometimes you don’t want an EQ on all the time, even when it is narrow.  Voxengo Soniformer bridges the gap between surgical EQ and multi-band compression providing the ability to solve crucial problems in ways that sound rather transparent (without negative artifacts) faster than I’ve never seen before.

I catch myself using Soniformer on lead vocals, vocal buses, the bass bus, the electric guitar bus, synths, and just about everything else where tones change depending on note and delivery.

I Almost Made This Myself

I had been in the market for so long for a plugin that would tame extremely narrow peaks that I actually put this on my list of future products to make.  I was fully prepared to make this thing and market it myself.  I was so thrilled when I found out Voxengo made it.  Awesome!!!

I was starting to think I was the only idiot who struggled with this peaky stuff.  I certainly don’t ever hear it on major label recordings.  Maybe I’m not entirely crazy.

The Tape Compression Preset

Forget the name of this preset.  I often like bright vocals.  As bright as Yellawolf and Die Antwerd can be, the vocals are [I]consistently bright[/I].  They don’t have one word make your ears bleed and another word sound dull.  This is something I’ve always struggled with.  I concluded the answer was to smash down any “bad” peaks and then boost the whole thing smoothly with a shelf.  The only problem was I wasn’t aware of a plugin smart enough to smash just the bad peaks with no false positives.  De-essers, as a general rule, aren’t THAT smart.

Here comes Soniformer.  It has ample resolution in those upper frequencies to compress the crap out of the bad peaks and leave everything else entirely alone.  Then a high shelf boost is totally straightforward.  The concept is incredible.  It’s exactly the kind of thing that analog hardware does by accident.  (We call it “color”.)    In digital plugin land, “accident” isn’t the way things are done.  You can’t just throw in a specific, nasty transformer with truckloads of character.  You have to know what that character is.  It’s my vote that a super smart plugin is the only way to get the kind of results in sound and workflow of the fancy old toys.  Plugins have fallen too short too often in getting this whole non-linear thing right.  Soniformer has gotten it right by tackling the job with pure brains.

Speaking of non-linearity, you simply draw your threshold or ratio or attack time to be more aggressive on the crappy stuff you want to tame.  Solved.  Done.  This non-linearity business is the entire point of Soniformer.

When Not To Use Voxengo Soniformer

I wouldn’t bother with Soniformer on any vocal that sounded great with just EQ, compression, or nothing.  It’s not the kind of thing I’d just add for my own amusement.  However, the second that a “broad strokes” multi-band isn’t detecting and solving the intermittent problems I’m hearing in any given track, Voxengo is the answer.

The GUI really makes this thing outstanding.  Your eyes can see a little peak at some random frequency and that makes drawing a threshold to catch that dude pretty damn straight forward.

Soniformer On 2bus/Mastering

The most important factor I’ve noticed now that all “peaky” material has been tamed on an individual track/bus basis the need for multi-band compression on the 2bus is much lighter.  In short, the use of Soniformer on individual tracks makes me need Soniformer on 2bus a lot less.  YMMV.    A light use of standard multi-band compression goes a long way.  Soniformer let’s you use even less for similar results.

My monitors are “too smooth” for my tastes.  That’s really another issue, but by setting the threshold to be more aggressive in the 1.5k-5k regions and maybe even using stronger ratios or faster attack times, I’m able to subtly shift a mix away from being heavy in those areas in very transparent ways.  This doesn’t make up for my monitors being what they are, but it does present the idea that a preset curve in Soniformer could be very useful on the 2bus/mastering if used very carefully.  This concept is still the hypothesis stage so use at your own peril  ;)

A Piece Of Cake Turned Upside Down

Ever tried to play a video game while looking in a mirror.  That’s a hair like what setting up Soniformer is like.  It takes about 10 minutes to get used to the fact that you are drawing lines on a screen for your thresholds, ratios, attack times, etc.  At first, this seems kinda awful.  Then when you think that you’d have to adjust the threshold of 32 bands all at the same time, the lines suddenly make tremendous sense.  They are genius.  So be patient with the workflow.  You will hate it for 10 minutes.  When you get it, you will think it’s brilliant.

Cons

No input gain
This one completely drives me crazy.  All multi-band tools with thresholds are highly dependent on the level of the source material.  (That’s what a threshold is!)  There’s a very fine line between too much compression and not nearly enough.  Adjusting the threshold globally in Soniformer is time consuming as it requires drawing lines.*

I’d LOVE to see the addition on input gain in a future release.  Now I toss a random plugin in front of Voxengo with an output gain control just so I can control how hard Soniformer is being hit.  This does slow down workflow just a bit and with a plugin that is so damn intelligent in its workflow and sound, it’s disappointing to be frustrated by a lack of input level.  The output level is appreciated for the exact same reason an input level WOULD be appreciated.

*Update:  Aleksey tells me that you can right click to select all the nodes/dotes and hold control to shift them up and down.  This means it is possible to move the entire envelope/drawing and keep relative settings in tact.  I STILL want an input level, but I’m known to wish in one hand.

Easy To Find Manual

I tip my hat to Voxengo for making the manual so damn easy to find.  I wish more plugin companies did this.  I’d imagine it would reduce their support load and save their users some grief.

Hint To Manufacturers:  Always put a link to your manual on the product page and call it “manual”.

Conclusion

Soniformer is a shovel in a world of finger-diggers.  It’s a NEW tool that does new things and solves new problems.  New, purpose-built tools are a zillion times more effective than the usual, boring, hair-splitting discussions of the differences between La3a plugins (when none of them sound like the hardware anyway…maybe).

I’m officially mad at all owners of Voxengo Soniformer that didn’t scream, “Thanksgiving turkey over here!!!!!!!!!!  We have a REVOLUTION!!!”  I suspect foul play…or fowl play.:D

I’m officially mad at myself for not somehow finding this plugin a least 5 years ago as I’ve desperately needed it.  Run, don’t walk, to the Voxengo site and try out Soniformer.

Saved Comments


shackman – 12-10-2012, 02:05 PM
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Fact is, Brandon, that Aleksey has been making top rate Plug ins for donkeys, but they appear not b=to be on the “Fashionable” list. I’ll send him the link to the page. He’ll be delighted!

I suggest yiour next test is to ruthe rule over voxengo Elephant or Voxengo Voxformer. Both now indispensable in my armoury. Haven’t made a recording without them for ages.

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m24p – 12-10-2012, 02:37 PM
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Sounds a lot like ReaFIR. I should try that plugin again.

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acidfrost – 12-10-2012, 06:57 PM
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Just got it! It was exactly what I needed for my current gig. Just recorded a choir live and had to tame down a glockenspiel in the choir mics.
Voxengo currently has a -25% on all plugins + 12% and up if you buy more than 2 plugs. It’s really worth it!
Thanks Brandon.

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paul999 – 12-10-2012, 07:12 PM
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This plug in has been a mainstay for me for the last couple years. I use it on exactly the sources you mentioned. Not so much on 2 buss.

BTW. The bark is pretty good over here:-)

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clarity – 12-11-2012, 12:06 AM
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Brandon, all I have to say is, I really like your style, bro!

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JoshERTW – 12-11-2012, 08:24 AM
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Just tried it out… Looks like you just cost me $80 cause now I’m going to need the full version

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51m0n – 12-11-2012, 08:39 AM
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ReaXcomp allows as many bands with as tight a Q as you want.

Surely that can achieve the same thing?

Then there is ReaFIR, which can do some similar processing in a different way….

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guywithaguitar – 12-11-2012, 08:41 AM
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Nice review.

This review gave me a heads up to the holiday discount on Voxengo. At 25% off on their already low list prices, some stuff is going really dirt cheap! I wonder if they have a good master compressor..

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Jan1973 – 12-11-2012, 08:47 AM
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I use Pro Audio DSP’s Dynamic Spectrum Mapper for the same purposes. De-Essing is one major use-case for sure.

For orchestra and/or choir recordings, it works wonders on the master bus as well.

I’ve been long looking for other companies to offer similar plugins, didn’t even know Voxengo had one, despite being a very happy GlissEQ and PHA-979 (and SPAN, of course) user.

Well, too late, got DSM V2 now. Luckily when they had a huge sale a few months back. And I’m very happy with it.

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Jan1973 – 12-11-2012, 08:50 AM
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I use Pro Audio DSP’s Dynamic Spectrum Mapper for the same purposes. De-Essing is one major use-case for sure. For orchestra and/or choir recordings, it works wonders on the master bus as well.

I’ve been long looking for other companies to offer similar plugins, didn’t even know Voxengo had one, despite being a very happy GlissEQ and PHA-979 (and SPAN, of course) user.

Well, too late, got DSM V2 now. Luckily when they had a huge sale a few months back. And I’m very happy with it.

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OldDog – 12-11-2012, 10:19 AM
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Great I just bought two semi hollow body guitars, now have to figure out how to fund this little gem.

I knew there was a reason I have stayed away from this forum for a while…………..

Best, -Harry

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shackman – 12-11-2012, 10:39 AM
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Quote Originally Posted by guywithaguitar View Post
Nice review.

This review gave me a heads up to the holiday discount on Voxengo. At 25% off on their already low list prices, some stuff is going really dirt cheap! I wonder if they have a good master compressor..
Voxengo Elephant. Superb!

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bapu – 12-11-2012, 12:09 PM
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I’m not so much an Elephant user (even though I own it) as I prefer FabFilter Pro-L. However for my voice (albeit a bad one) Voxformer is a must nearly 100% of the time.

Just picked up Soniformer for $64 because of my permanent discount and the 25% off sale right now.

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Dahla – 12-11-2012, 12:33 PM
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Well, I never tried it but I just bought it. The 25% didn’t hurt either. I have always struggled with some tracks that I can’t make fit with anything before so I’m thrilled to try this now.

You had me at turkey!

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cporro – 12-11-2012, 01:05 PM
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what’s the difference between something like this and a flexible multiband processor? i just added 30 bands to reaper’s stock multiband. if my math is right that breaks down everything audible into about 1/3rd octave bands. a few notes. save that as a preset. and as someone else mentioned there is reafir.

see i’m in this evaluate what you have phase right now. this may be a candidate for a null test imo.

on a side note. brandon, you should consider comedy writing. your stuff always entertains me and i’m a big fan of your philosophy in general (by coincidence happens to be my own)

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brandondrury – 12-11-2012, 03:19 PM
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what’s the difference between something like this and a flexible multiband processor?
I’m going use redneck physics jive here so bare with me.

When a Slate kick drum hits, you see a relatively even frequency response under 100Hz or so in SPAN. Its “total energy” under 100Hz is pretty damn high. I’m guessing only white/pink/whatever noise would be higher. If we had some kick that hit at EXACTLY 62Hz and had ZERO energy at 50Hz or 70Hz, it’s “total energy” wouldn’t be that high even if the little bitty narrow peak had a much louder peak.

Well, a multiband compressor is looking for the total energy of the frequency band. Our little blip kick drum is going to flow through undetected. A kick drum won’t matter much in this case. A better example is sibilance or random 1k-2k high Q vocal peaks.

If you’ve got a multiband compressor that you can add a bajillion bands to (many good ones mentioned here) I’d imagine it would be the same basic thing as Soniformer. Soniformer vs TheSameThing gets into the New And Improved SM57 crap I mentioned in the article. Being a Cubase user I wasn’t aware of such a gadget (Steinberg, innovators of the VST format, and always 5 years behind in plugins.). Voxengo Soniformer got to me first. They win….for me anyway.

on a side note. brandon, you should consider comedy writing. your stuff always entertains me and i’m a big fan of your philosophy in general (by coincidence happens to be my own)
Which philosophy? The one that marriage is leased prostitution?

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cporro – 12-11-2012, 07:46 PM
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Quote Originally Posted by brandondrury View Post
I’m going use redneck physics jive here so bare with me.
i told my parents that fluency class in redneck physics would pay off some day. so there ‘rents!

i’m with ya. i thought you might say that some multibands used the unsplit signal as a trigger in which case i’d have to do some tests on the reaper plug and see what’s happening.

i don’t really use anything narrow with it. the best use i find is using 2 bands. upper band is the only one active and i use it to smoove out things. the crossover can be as low as 1k. 4:1 ratio and lots of reduction on some stuff….maybe 10db. that’s become a staple for me. the thing that surprised me was how wide the band is.

Which philosophy? The one that marriage is leased prostitution?
the one where you use your brain (and start questioning the gear-industrial complex).

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m24p – 12-11-2012, 11:35 PM
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I just got the demo and pitted it against ReaFIR in tacking care of some ear-splitting pick attack sections on the guitar. ReaFIR in compression mode won. I’m not posting the results here because I bet you could do better with Sonformer if you knew how to use it, but ReaFIR won handily so I suspect it could still win. Looks like Soniformer has a ton more options and stuff, though. Anyway, it seems like ReaFIR can your friend for dealing with weird spectral peaks – and it comes stock with Reaper, which is only $60 for most of us. To anyone on a tight budget, you should be using Reaper already. And if you are, check out ReaFIR in compression mode vs the soniformer demo for cleaning up weird peaks. It might save you some money, or you might fall in love with Soniformer and get it anyway. Either way.

ReaFIR’s subtract mode vs Voxengo’s Redunoise didn’t fair so well, though. I did a noisy hissy amp with a delay. There were obvious, odd artifacts in the delay tails in ReaFIR subtract, but Redunoise just sounded a little bit thinner in the quietest parts.

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cporro – 12-11-2012, 11:53 PM
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interesting about reafir. so far i haven’t used it. when i first got reaper i was not impressed with the stock stuff. but the more i used it the more it grew on me. i came from using samplitude which has some very sophisticated plugins that also look great. in comparison reapers are sparse both on graphics and parameters. but i’ve found them very useful.

i did a comprehensive (by that i mean it took me forever and my hairline moved back 1/2″) comparison a while back. Reaper vs Samplitude… Sorta | BlueDustStudio / Chris Porro

now i use reaper and the reaxcomp (reaper stock multiband) a lot. will check out refir. thx.

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Paul2open – 12-12-2012, 09:15 AM
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I just bought Soniformer – on a whim really – and I tried it on the 2 bus with a ‘tape compression’ preset, mainly because I haven’t worked out how to use it yet, and wow, my fairly nice, slightly under mixed song sounded awesome suddenly! Brighter but smoother, more coherent, lovely! Will look into it further very soon. Vocals top of the list to try. Thanks Brandon for the tip!

shackman – 12-12-2012, 11:56 AM
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Quote Originally Posted by Paul2open View Post
I just bought Soniformer – on a whim really – and I tried it on the 2 bus with a ‘tape compression’ preset, mainly because I haven’t worked out how to use it yet, and wow, my fairly nice, slightly under mixed song sounded awesome suddenly! Brighter but smoother, more coherent, lovely! Will look into it further very soon. Vocals top of the list to try. Thanks Brandon for the tip!
That’s what I did with Voxengo elephant. Plugeed it onto the 2 bus, used a preset and wowe. Now, years later, I know how to use it and WOW WOW WOW!

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Burny – 12-12-2012, 05:50 PM
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If you liked Soniformer check out IQ-EQ: HOFA IQ-Eq_en

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timandmonica – 12-15-2012, 01:01 AM
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I first thought of ReaXcomp, as many others obviously did while reading Brandon’s article. The thing that REALLY surprised me is that it is FREE and no one has mentioned that! It’s part of their free ReaPlugs VST’s that they give away for people who don’t own Reaper but want to check out the plugs (especially, for me, the humble yet AMAZING js plugin format. You use JS as a plugin then are allowed to use the free library of hundreds of free plugins from there, like 1176′s, guitar amps. etc.)

But back to my main point – ReaXcomp is FREE. It allows unlimited bands in a multi-band compressor and can accomplish the same thing Soniformer can as far as I can tell.

On one hand I feel bad – like I’m undermining Brandon’s recommendation. But on the other hand, much of his studio philosophy has been based on “Why spend a ton of money on things if you simply don’t HAVE to?”

Last note: I’m a big fan of Voxengo (LOVE Elephant – used it for too many years to count!) I don’t want to put him out of business or anything but I doubt this measly post could do such a thing :-)

DOWNLOAD LINK: REAPER | ReaPlugs

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cporro – 12-15-2012, 09:06 AM
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Quote Originally Posted by timandmonica View Post
The thing that REALLY surprised me is that it is FREE and no one has mentioned that! It’s part of their free ReaPlugs VST’s that they give away for people who don’t own Reaper but want to check out the plugs
i’ve been using and liking reaper for 2 years and i didn’t know that. as i said before i’m a fan of the reaper stuff…”rea” and “js”.

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Dahla – 12-15-2012, 11:19 AM
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I did not know that either. People have talked about these plugs alot, and I’ve always been curious about them, but I just thought there were alot of Reaper users out there. Not interested in switching from cubase, but I can check these out.

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m24p – 12-15-2012, 12:51 PM
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Quote Originally Posted by Dahla View Post
I did not know that either. People have talked about these plugs alot, and I’ve always been curious about them, but I just thought there were alot of Reaper users out there. Not interested in switching from cubase, but I can check these out.
I’ve tried to recommend them to a lot of people in the past. It doesn’t come with quite everything but it comes with most of it and there are really easy to work with.

On the topic of Soniformer – after using the demo for a bit I DO think I’m going to have to buy it. Yes you can do pretty much the exacts same stuff with Reaper’s stock plugs but the workflow for Soniformer will make shaping the sound spectrum super fast and easy for certain applications. It’s just well set up. I’m just trying to decide what else to buy from Voxengo.

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shackman – 12-16-2012, 03:34 AM
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Quote Originally Posted by m24p View Post
I’m just trying to decide what else to buy from Voxengo.
For what it’s worth, and repeating myself, I use Elephant on everything as a master bus compressor. It’s completly transparent to my ears and does and amazing job.

My other favourite (though less use) is Voxformer – a Voxengo version of a channel strip. It’s allegedly for vox, but can be used on most things and has easy to control compressors (two or one) , gate, dehisser, ermmm, 4 band eq and some very nice little extras.

Both are hugely controlable through extra editing setting – a mass to learn, I think I’be only scratched the surface.

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guywithaguitar – 12-16-2012, 11:50 PM
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Quote Originally Posted by shackman View Post
For what it’s worth, and repeating myself, I use Elephant on everything as a master bus compressor. It’s completly transparent to my ears and does and amazing job.

My other favourite (though less use) is Voxformer – a Voxengo version of a channel strip. It’s allegedly for vox, but can be used on most things and has easy to control compressors (two or one) , gate, dehisser, ermmm, 4 band eq and some very nice little extras.

Both are hugely controlable through extra editing setting – a mass to learn, I think I’be only scratched the surface.
It does look really good. Isn’t it a limiter, though?

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shackman – 12-17-2012, 03:17 AM
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Which?

Aleksey describes Elephant as a mastering limiter, which is fascinating because you CAN force it to breach it’s own limiter top levels!. When I run it on the master bus, I always run a limiter after it to catch any peaks that do just that.

I keep telling Aleksey that he’s losing sales because that “limiter” description will put a ton of folks off buying what is a much more useful piece of kit.

My useage is much more to push the levels UP to a decent level in today’s LOUD commercial market. The joy of it is that it remains COMPLETELY transparent no matter what you throw at it.

As to Voxformer. no it’s not.

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guywithaguitar – 12-17-2012, 07:33 AM
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Oh sorry, I meant Elephant. If it isn’t a mastering limiter, then what exactly is it?

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shackman – 12-17-2012, 01:37 PM
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Quote Originally Posted by guywithaguitar View Post
Oh sorry, I meant Elephant. If it isn’t a mastering limiter, then what exactly is it?
Well, to my mind, it’s a maximiser which also limits peaks and compresses the sound – and all transparently.

My best suggestiion is download the demo and try it. You’ll see what I mean

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EAsounds – 12-17-2012, 11:34 PM
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I really could use something like this… a high-resolution multiband comp.. Only trouble with Voxengo is that I’m cheap and don’t want to shell out extra $99 in order to run .VST

Can anyone recommend a similar multiband comp solution that is offered in RTAS?

Cheers.
Erik A.

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guywithaguitar – 12-18-2012, 01:04 AM
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Quote Originally Posted by shackman View Post
Well, to my mind, it’s a maximiser which also limits peaks and compresses the sound – and all transparently.

My best suggestiion is download the demo and try it. You’ll see what I mean

I’ll do that, thanks. If it’s what you say it is, then I’ve been looking for something like that for ages.

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m24p – 12-18-2012, 10:26 AM
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Quote Originally Posted by EAsounds View Post
I really could use something like this… a high-resolution multiband comp.. Only trouble with Voxengo is that I’m cheap and don’t want to shell out extra $99 in order to run .VST

Can anyone recommend a similar multiband comp solution that is offered in RTAS?

Cheers.
Erik A.
If you’re cheap, why are you running pro tools? I think it was offered in rtas anyway…
EDIT: I see that it isn’t, but you could do a workaround like the one described here: Why no audio units for PT? – Avid Audio Forums
1. You always can load your audio units and mac vst into external vst/au host like Pedalboard2 2. Set its audio output to virtual audio device like Soundflower.
3. Add this device to Pro tools Aggregate device to gain additional ins and outs. Then you can create audio track in Pro tools and set its audio input to that virtual audio device.
And there’s TONS of great plugins that you are missing out on. NastyDLA for example.

AmorEtam’s Avatar
AmorEtam – 12-18-2012, 06:59 PM
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Anyone having Voxengo Soniformer eating a lot of cpu in protools??
(I am using Vst to Rtas)
is this normal?… I am working on a 96khz project and the cpu usage for this plugin alone is 17%

Thanks

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m24p – 12-18-2012, 09:49 PM
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It used around 4% per instance at 48 kHz in Reaper for me, which may be similar, depending on your CPU.

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AmorEtam – 12-18-2012, 10:30 PM
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yeah, maybe, I have a i5 2500…. I guess that s normal…. but I wont be able to use it inm this session, unless I apply the audio suite equivalent or something

thanks

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clarity – 12-21-2012, 12:00 AM
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Well, I’ve been trying it out recently, and I must say — it’s clearly not like the multiband compressors I have. It just sounds different. Maybe it’s their algorithms and characteristic mojo, but if I were all of you, I would simply get it and see for myself. And this is not mentioning how their oversampling options are making me want nearly ALL of their plugins. If you have a DAW that can do easy track freeze/bounce (like Studio One 2), these types of plugins are the STUFF! Besides, I’m not sure what Voxengo has got going on inside of them, but they’re unbelievably unique — like in their own class and league. Great stuff.

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clarity – 12-21-2012, 12:05 AM
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Voxengo’s slogan should be: “Not Just Another Color.”

 

Brandon Drury

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Brandon Drury quit counting at 1,200 recorded songs in his busy home recording studio. He is the creator of RecordingReview.com and is the author of the Killer Home Recording series.
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3 responses to Voxengo Soniformer: The Greatest Secret Since The Kennedy Assassination

  1. I feel sorry that I haven’t found that plug-in 5 years ago too !!!!

    Take care

  2. I seldom read a review from top to bottom, but this had me in stitches! Going to explore your site properly now!

    I’m just curious, but have you tried Dynamic Spectrum Mapper, and if you have do you find it to be a similarly efficacious tool with taming harshness whilst leaving the good stuff be?

    :-)

  3. I’ve never tried Dynamic Spectrum Mapper. It looks like it may be of a similar concept, but it seems from the screenshots to be operating in more of an automated mode. If I understand the text right, Dynamic Spectrum Mapper needs some kind of source file to read, get a feel for its frequency curve, and then apply that curve to the track at hand.

    I’m not sure how it applies the curve so I really can’t say if it works like Soniformer or not. Soniformer is basically a 32-band compressor with controls for attack, release, ratio, and makeup gain for every once of those. The would be a nightmare normally, but they made it fun to use by letting you draw the settings in.

    It’s possible that Dynamic Spectrum Mapper is using EQ, the same type of compression in Soniformer, or something entirely different. It’s hard to say.

    Brandon

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